Hearing book suggestions from coworkers is one of the best perks of working in a public library! We hear about books from publishers, library journals, patrons, coworkers, and friends, and we love sharing favorites. Here’s what Baldwin staff members are enjoying this month:

For Adults

Circe by Madeline Miller
The classic mythological story of the Odyssey but told from Circe’s point of view. An exciting and unique retelling of the stories of the Greek gods and goddesses who have influenced storytelling for thousands of years. –recommended by Denise

Conviction by Denise Mina
Denise Mina has written an extraordinary thriller involving . . . podcasting! After experiencing the pain of her husband’s affair with her best friend and losing her children to them, Anna’s tragic past life surfaces to entangle her in a murder mystery investigation surrounding a former friend and his family. Anna podcasts her investigation into the murder and uses live podcasting to capture the killer. –recommended by Denise

The Dutch House by Ann Patchett
The Dutch House is a lovely, quiet novel about the lives of siblings Danny and Maeve Conroy and how their grand family home moves from the centerpoint of their childhood to a complicated memory in their adult years. Tom Hanks is the audiobook narrator and listening to this book was a delight. –recommended by Rebekah

Lost You by Haylen Beck
In this psychological thriller written by Haylen Beck, a pseudonym for Stuart Neville, an Edgar winner, a childless young woman becomes involved in desperate circumstances in pursuit of becoming a mother. Harrowing and chilling throughout! –recommended by Lisa

My Lovely Wife in the Psych Ward: A Memoir by Mark Lukach
Fascinating memoir of mental illness from the caregiver’s angle. – recommended by Wesleyann

Symphony for the City of the Dead: Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad by M.T. Anderson
This searing portrait of the life of Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich focuses especially on his survival of the siege of Leningrad during WWII, during which time he composed his seventh symphony – while millions of his fellow citizens starved to death. Written for a young adult audience in an engaging and dramatic style, this book will appeal to adults as well. –recommended by Maria

For Children & Teens

Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers. It would be terrible if we just skipped from September to November, wouldn’t it?” Now is the perfect time to revisit this children’s classic, also available as either an ebook or e-audiobook from Hoopla! –recommended by Sarah

The Bridge Home by Padma Ventrakaman
Venkatraman proves her skill as a narrator as well as a writer in this compelling story. The well-drawn, relatable characters, palpable setting, and a plot packed with surprising twists that include humor, heartbreak, and suspense, will move young readers while fostering empathy towards those less fortunate than themselves. –recommended by Donna

Emmy in the Key of Code by Aimee Lucido
Twelve-year-old Emmy comes from a musical family (Mom sings opera, Dad is a concert pianist) but feels like she isn’t good at anything until she discovers how to compose her own songs using computer code. This middle school novel weaves together a story of friendship, discovery, musical terms, and coding.–recommended by Kathleen

Pumpkinheads by Rainbow Rowell
This is a YA contemporary romance novel in graphic format about two friends who work in a pumpkin patch. It’s their last shift before going off to college the following year, and the night is full of adventure, yummy fall foods, and self-discovery. –recommended by Elisabeth

We’re Not From Here by Geoff Rodkey
An excellent, timely story on immigration, tolerance, refugees, and more all wrapped in an a humorous science fiction novel. Children and adults will love this novel that shows how it only takes a few kind souls to change the world. –recommended by Stephanie

 

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